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University of Alberta U-Drive Site

­The following link will take you to the U of A U-Drive Site.  Please check the U-Drive site if you have questions regarding your eligibility to rent University Vehicles.   There is an authorization process that must be followed before a­nyone is allowed to operate the various U of A owned, rented or leased motor vehicles.

U-Drive Site

Graduated Driver’s Licence

Information on this page was written by Barry McCashin.  The Department of Earth &      Atmospheric Sciences would like to thank Barry for allowing us to post this information on our web-site.

Obtaining an Albert­a Class 5 Driver’s License:

March 16, 2006

To drive a University of Alberta vehicle, you must have a full (non-probationary) class 5 license issued in Canada or the USA. You cannot drive with a Learner’s Permit (class 7) or a probationary license (Class 5-GDL). This can have an impact on new University Personnel’s access to vehicles if:

  • a person has not obtained a driver’s license until recently and needs a vehicle for field research.
  • visiting scientists who have licenses from outside of North America (however, if they have driven for more than 2 years and they establish residency in Alberta, they can qualify to get an AB license)

In 2003, Alberta instituted a Graduated Driver License (GDL) system that applies to all persons who are new to driving irrespective of age. The purpose of this system is to ensure that people have the time to develop the skills needed to drive safely before they are given a full, non-probationary, Class 5 license without restrictions. There are two stages in the GDL system: a learners stage and a Probationary stage that you must pass through before you can take the advanced driving road test to qualify for the non-probationary license.
If you have not had a drivers license before; then the sequence is:

  1. Learners Stage (Class 7 license):
    • To get a Learners Permit you must:
      • be at least 14 years old
      • pass a vision test
      • pass a driving knowledge test
    • You must stay at this stage for at least 1 year and follow several driving restrictions.
  2. Probationary Stage (Class 5-GDL license):
    • To qualify for this stage, you must
      • have had a learners permit for at least 1 year
      • be at least 16 years old
      • pass a Standard (Basic) Road test
    • You must spend at least 2 years at this stage and follow several driving restrictions
  3. Non-Probationary Stage:
    • To qualify for a full Class 5 license, after driving for at least 2 years as a Probationary driver, you must pass an Advanced Road test.

Note: It will take at least 3 years to go from a Learners permit to a full Class 5 license.

If you have had a license from another jurisdiction and want to transfer to an Alberta license, then you must:

  • if licensed for less than 2 years:
    1. do the vision test, the knowledge test and the Basic road test to get a Probationary license.
    2. after you have driven a total of at least 2 years, you can take the Advanced Road test to get a full Class 5 license
  • if licensed for at least 2 years:
    1. do the vision test and the knowledge test
    2. do the Advanced road test to qualify for a full Class 5 licence.

Note: if your driving license is from anywhere else in Canada or from a country having a reciprocal agreement with Alberta (Austria, Belgium, Germany, Japan, Switzerland, Republic of Korea, United Kingdom, United States of America), you may simply transfer your current licence to an Alberta license without doing any testing.

To get an Alberta license, you must be a resident of the province so collaborators who are only here on a temporary basis will not be able to do this. The University of Alberta does not require you to transfer to an Alberta license if you have a license from anywhere else in Canada or the USA but provincial regulations requires that within 90 days of establishing residency in a province, that you must obtain a license from that jurisdiction (exception: students enrolled in a post secondary program).

Further information is available at:

 

Transport of Dangerous Goods (TDG)

Purpose of TDG Regulations

The Transport of Dangerous Goods Act is federal legislation designed to regulate the movement of dangerous goods via roads, rail, air, and ship. The aim is to ensure that any shipping is done in a manner that enhances the safety of the person involved in the transport as well as the general public. In case of accident, emergency officials can quickly identify the hazard based on the warning placards displayed on the vehicle.

The Transport of Dangerous Goods Regulations are the guidelines used to promote the aims of the Act. The Province of Alberta passed the TDG Act in 1982 and later adopted the federal TDG regulations. Unfortunately, these regulations are very detailed and difficult to interpret for someone who hasn’t studied them extensively. Because of this, the guidelines are being rewritten and will appear in the form called “Clear Language Regulations” to distinguish them from the original attempt at codifying these complex issues. These new regulations were implemented in 2002. You can view the TDG regulations at the following website: http://www.tc.gc.ca/tdg/clear/menu.htm.

Requirements for transporting items that are dangerous goods:

As with the WHMIS standards, items are considered hazardous if they have certain properties related to pressure, flammability, toxicity, biohazard or corrosiveness. If you are transporting items that are considered to be dangerous goods, then you need to meet certain criteria in terms of training, packaging, transporting, documenting and using warning labels. Specifications may differ for transport via road, rail, ship and air.

IS TDG similar to WHMIS?:

TDG (Transportation of Dangerous Goods), and WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System), are complementary hazard communication systems.

The purpose of TDG is to protect the general public from hazards associated with dangerous goods during transport.

WHMIS, on the other hand, was developed to help workers safely handle hazardous materials in the workplace.

No overlap is intended – where one system leaves off, the other takes over.

How does TDG affect EAS workers?

If you ship, receive or **transport dangerous goods, you must be trained and carry a Certificate of Training, or work under the direct supervision of someone who is trained. You should be fully conversant with the TDG Act and Regulations. There are fines and possible imprisonment for receiving and shipping hazardous materials improperly.

**This may apply to field courses/work when you take controlled products into the field with you. Transportation of Dangerous Goods training is available through the Office of Environmental Health & Safety as an E-course. To enroll in a TDG course visit their website at:  TDG Training.   Sign up for their TDG 101 course.

There are exemptions for limited quantity transportation, but you must check the limits for each dangerous good and comply with the correct transportation regulations pertaining to the packaging and size of containers being taken in the field. Every hazardous material you need to carry into the field must be investigated to ensure that you are carrying no more than the limited quantities allowed under this act. (If you wish to carry more than the limited quantities then the dangerous good falls under TDG regulations and must be properly packaged for transport, properly labeled, vehicle properly placarded, and file an Emergency Response Plan with the Transportation Department.)  You need to check the limited quantity yearly as the regulations are updated every year.

To check what the limited quantities are for the controlled products you need to take in the field, contact: Lois Dvorsky, Office of Environmental Health and Safety at the U of A or phone her at: 780-492-1638. You can e-mail Lois at lois.dvorsky@ehs.ualberta.ca

You can also check with Transport Canada regarding the dangerous good and what qualifies as a limited quantity. Remember, each dangerous good will have its own limited quantities regulations limiting the amount, type of packaging and emergency response plan. http://www.tc.gc.ca/TDG/menu.htm

Canada Post Information:

Should you have questions about the types of materials that can be sent through the mail contact Canada Post Customer service (1-800-267-1177), as they have information on restrictions for items sent through the mail.

Canada Post does not ship dangerous goods!

General Procedures for Walk-in Freezers

Walk-in Freezers

The Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences has several walk-in freezers.  The walk-in freezers are used for storage of ice samples, lake core samples and meteorite samples and as a preparation area for laboratory procedures on such specimens. These facilities pose special risks to workers. All workers should be aware of the possibility of hypothermia, the enclosed space causing reduced oxygen levels as well as poorly or non-functioning opening mechanisms. Cooperation and respect for the facility are requested.

When you are in the freezers, you are often “alone” in that room, even during regular work hours. You should be aware of this and take the necessary precautions to reduce your risk. Basic precautions for working in the freezer are:

  1. Try always to work with a buddy. There is safety in numbers and an immediate support system in the event of an emergency.
  2. Be aware! Cold temperatures affect you both mentally and physically.
  3. Tell someone, your supervisor or another co-worker that you are going to work in the walk-in freezer and when you will return. If you are going to be in the freezer for an extended period, timed checks are advised. Do not forget to report back to that contact person at the agreed upon time(s)!
  4. You should be aware that cell phones might not work well in the walk-in freezer. Before relying on this as a communications device, check to see if it will work in that space. Remember that frozen batteries might disable the phone.  The EAS Department has several two-way radios that can be borrowed when working alone in the freezers (contact , Peter Carlson at 492-6443)

You should familiarize yourself with the various agencies/offices in the Emergency Guide in the front of the University phone book.

                                    Protective Services:  780-492-5050

     Call 911 for Police, Fire or Ambulance

Regulations outlined below must be followed or permission for future visits or work sessions will be denied. The Student Code of Behavior is applicable.

Regulations for  Walk-in Freezer

  1. Before entering the freezer, CHECK the door latch opens easily from the inside. If working for an extended period, check the door mechanism hourly to ensure that it has not frozen shut.
  2. Have a contact person and a check-in schedule. Ensure that your contact can access the freezer or Campus Security if the need arises. Check-in at least once an hour. Cold temperature reduces you mental alertness and physical coordination, so do not work in the freezers for extended periods without a physical and mental rest period. Access is restricted to regular University hours of operation, no evening or weekend work.
  3. Any work that requires moving, shelving/retrieval of heavy boxes or ice core must not be done alone.
  4. An appropriate stool or ladder should be used for shelving/removal of ice core or material from the upper storage shelves.
  5. No food or drink is to be stored or consumed in the walk-in freezers.
  6. Unlabelled samples or boxes will be discarded without notice, but do not move or disturb others samples/material/experiments.
  7. Coats/mittens/head wear or other fabric items of work gear must be hung on the hangers provided outside of the walk-in freezer. Fabric items should not be left on the floor, tables, chairs, storage boxes or blocking the cooling unit machinery.
  8. DO NOT change the temperature of the freezer. Unauthorized temperature changes can affect experiments or samples. Only U of A Facilities Management personnel can change the walk-in freezer temperature with permission from the supervisor.  Many of the freezers are alarmed, so changing the temperature could cause false alarms at Control Center.
  9. Freezer door must NOT be propped open. To prevent unauthorized entry to the walk-in freezer, the laboratory hallway door must be locked at all times when the offices or facilities are unoccupied.
  10. Do not block or cover the cooling fan units inside the freezer or the cooling unit outside of the freezer.

Persons to be notified in case of emergency are:

  • David Chesterman, Undergraduate Laboratory Coordinator 780-492-8494
  • Diane Caird, Safety Committee 780-492-1122
  • M-J Turnell, Assistant Chair Admin.  780-492-3216
  • Robert Creaser, Chair of EAS Safety Committee       780-492-2942

 

Standard Operating Procedure

EAS areas of South Campus

Background

During the winter of 1999-2000 Building F-52 and the General Storage Building suffer­ed from a major infestation of mice. Droppings, dried urine and bodies were noted throughout both buildings. The presence of mice presents a potential biohazard, i.e. the possibility of the Hanta virus, which is extremely dangerous to humans. All recognizable and reachable traces of the infestation were removed from F-52 during the summer and the normal work areas were disinfected. It was not possible to clean all stacked/stored material, nor is it possible to completely exclude future intrusions of field mice so there will be a continuing potential biohazard. A continuing hazard will exist in the General Storage Building, which is open to continued access by field mice and is not under our control. An information package about this potential biohazard is provided. Contact Lisa Budney, Rm B-01 ESB at 780-288-0109 or D. Caird ESB Rm. B-06 or 1-13, 780-492-1122 or 248-1270 to obtain a copy of this package.

Before being granted permission to access or work in either building, you are required to sign that you have read and understood this information.

Mouse poison and traps will be used in Building F-52, and checked regularly to monitor and to eliminate the mouse population as much as possible in that building.

All persons visiting or working in this facility must be aware of the continuing potential biohazard and the steps to be taken if evidence of mice is found. Regulations outlined on the next page must be followed or permission for future visits/work sessions will be denied.

You should familiarize yourself with the various agencies/offices in the Emergency Guide in the front of the University phone book.

Protective Services:  780-492-5050

Call 911 for Police, Fire or Ambulance

Regulations

  1. All visits to the EAS facilities on the South Campus (Building F-52 and the General Storage Building, later called either building) must be entered in the log maintained by the Collections Manager. Contact Lisa Budney, Rm B-01 ESB at 780-288-0109 or D. Caird Rm. B-06 or 1-13 ESB, 780-492-1122 or 248-1270.
  2. Any work that requires moving or examining material in either building must not be carried out alone. Solo visits are to be made only during regular working hours. Along with the key, you will be given a cell phone and during extended visits, lasting more than an hour, persons working alone must phone the main office every 2 to 3 hours and check in. The phone must be returned with the keys.
  3. Access to the forklift in Building F-52 is restricted to qualified EAS personnel. If you require the use of the forklift, arrangements will be made for EAS personnel to accompany you to the farm and they will operate the forklift.
  4. No food or drink is to be brought into either building, stored or consumed on the premises and no empty food or drink containers may be left anywhere inside the buildings, including in the trash bins.  Such items will attract mice into the building.
  5. No camping cooking equipment may be stored in either building.  The food odours will attact mice to the building.
  6. Any fabric items to be stored (i.e. sleeping bags, all-weather parkas, or other camping gear) must be sealed in mouse-proof containers, preferably a plastic (Rubbermaid style) storage box or a metal box or barrel.
  7. Lab coats or other fabric items of work gear must be hung on the hangers provided. Fabric items must not be left on the floor, tables, chairs or storage boxes.
  8. Prior to moving or accessing any stored material the user must ensure that there are no traces of mice on or around the material in question. If mouse droppings, dried urine or mouse bodies, killed by the poison in use in the building, are found then all work in that area must cease and the appropriate personnel in the EAS department, listed below, must be notified to arrange a decontamination and cleanup of the area.

Persons to be notified are:

  • Lisa Budney  780-288-0109
  • Diane Caird, Safety Committee, 780-492-1122
  • MJ Turnell, Assistant Chair (Admin.) 780-492-3216

General Procedures for Rock Saw Room

The Provincial Working­ Alone Regulation took affect on April 30, 2001. In compliance, the EAS Safety Committe has assessed the risk levels for access to the Rock Saw Facility

  1. The Rock Saw Facility can only be accessed from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. weekdays. There will be no after hours or weekend access to the area.
  2. The Rock Saw facility has card-swipe access.   All personnel must signup to use this room and leave the room clean prior to finishing for the day.  After 4:00 p.m. your card will not open the door. The General Office Secretary can see your time in and time out of this facility. As always, do not allow anyone else access to the facility when you have signed up to use the Rock Saw room.  Everyone has to go through the training process to gain access to this facility.  Failure to follow the rules may result in you losing your access to the Rock Saw room.
  3. All personnel must be trained by Mark Labbe on how to use the equipment in this facility. Mark will have you sign a training record, stating that you have received training and that you understand how to safely operate the equipment. SOP’s for all equipment in the room have been posted. Workers are required to wear the safety equipment provided when using the rock saws.
  4. REPORT ANY FAULTY EQUIPMENT TO MARK LABBE IMMEDIATELY AT 780-492-7301.
  5. All personnel must have completed the Department of EAS WHMIS/Safety training before accessing this facility.
  6. Emergency phone numbers have been posted by the exit to this room.  Report any injuries to Diane Caird, Mark Labbe or Mary-Jane Turnell.

Failure to follow these rules will revoke your privileges to access this facility.

You should familiarize yourself with the various agencies/offices in the Emergency Guide in the front of the University phone book.

Protective Services:  780-492-5050

Call 911 for Police, Fire or Ambulance

General Procedures for Rock Crushing Room

Working Alone Regulation are in effect for this area. The Department Safety Committee has assessed the risk levels of all areas in the department. The following changes have been made for access to the Rock Crushing Room:

  1. The Rock Crushing Room can be accessed during regular work hours only, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. weekdays. There will be no after hours or weekend access to the area.
  2. This area has card-swipe access. To obtain access – see the General Secretary in Room 1-26 ESB.  Access will not be given until you have completed the EAS WHMIS/Safety Seminar and have been trained in the proper and safe use of the equipment in the Rock Crushing room by Mark Labbe. There is a calendar on the door – you must sign up for the days that you will need the room.  If you do not show up by 9:00 a.m. on the date you signed, the room will be forfeited to the next user.  Consistently not showing up when you have signed up will result in all of your bookings being removed from the calendar.  Your card-swipe access will not open the doors after 4:00 p.m.
  3. Do not allow anyone else access to the Rock Crushing Facility while you are working within the facility.  They must access the room/s with their own card to gain access to this area. Violating this rule could cause your access to be removed.
  4. The Department Technician, Mark Labbe will train all personnel on how to use the equipment in this facility. Mark will require you to sign a training record stating that you have received training and that you understand how to safely operate the equipment. SOP’s for all equipment in the room have been posted. Any subsequent training for special research protocols will be provided by the primary researcher AFTER Mark has completed the initial training.
  5. All personnel will sign the logbook in the room and indicate which crusher or apparatus they are using. REPORT ANY FAULTY EQUIPMENT TO MARK LABBE IMMEDIATELY AT 780-492-7301.
  6. User’s will be required to call their contact person on an hourly basis.
  7. Emergency phone numbers have been posted by the exit to this room. In any emergency situation, call for help immediately. The phone number to the Rock Crushing Room is 780-492-6123
  8. Failure to follow these rules will revoke your privileges to access this facility.

You should familiarize yourself with the various agencies/offices in the Emergency Guide in the front of the University phone book.

Protective Services: 780-492-5050

Call 911 for Police, Fire or Ambulance

General Procedures for Personal Offices

The Provincial “Working Alone” Regulations took affect on April 30, 2001. The Safety Committee has assessed areas in the department and has assigned a risk level to all areas. Offices have a low, but real, risk level.

During regular hours, 8:­00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., there are many people available to assist you in case of emergency. However, when you work alone after hours, or if your office is in a particularly isolated/remote location, the risk increases. In that case you should be aware of your personal vulnerability and take steps to reduce it. You are responsible for your own personal safety.

  1. The most effective means to reduce the personal vulnerability risk is simply to use the “buddy system”, i.e. work with a buddy or co-worker. There is safety in numbers and an immediate support system in the event of an emergency.
  2. If you choose to work alone or if the “buddy system” is not feasible, consider the following:
    1. Be aware of your surroundings at all times. You may wish to keep your door locked.
    2. Have a communications plan in place, which can be
      • To simply tell a friend or a family member that you will be working in the lab/office alone/after hours and when you will be returning home. If you do not arrive at the scheduled time, they should contact you to see why you have not arrived home.
      • Utilize Protective Services Lone Worker program @780-4925252 and inform them where you will be working, your time in and estimated time out (they will request this information to enable them to deal with emergencies). Never leave without calling them to report out. For information on the Lone Worker service view their web-page at: Lone Worker Program  and use SAFEWALK to get to your car. Phone 780-492-5563 or 4WALKME.
      • Carry a cell phone.
      • Never let anyone into the building if they do not have their own key.
      • Report any unusual building activities to Protective Services, 780-492-5050.

You should familiarize yourself with the various agencies/offices in the Emergency Guide in the front of the University phone book.

Protective Services: 780-492-5050

Call 911 for Police, Fire or Ambulance

Working in the Head House Protocols

 

The Provincial Working Alone Regulations are in effect even during regular work hours. The Head House can be a remote location during regular work hours as often there is no one else working on the basement level.  For this reason you are asked to follow one of the w­orking alone procedures below:

  1. Try always to work with a buddy. There is safety in numbers and an immediate support system in the event of an emergency.
  2. Be aware of your surroundings at all times.
  3. Report any unusual building activities to Protective Services @ 780-492 5050.
  4. If you are working alone in the Head House basement you should ensure that someone knows where you are working and when you will return to the lab or your office. If you do not report back on the agreed time, your contact person should check on you.  Be sure to check back with them if you have a change of plans.
  5. Although you may carry a cell phone, you should be aware that some cell phones do not work in the Head House basement area.  Before you rely on your cell phone as a means of communication – check to see if it will work in the Head House basement.  You may have to go to a stairwell to obtain cellphone reception.
  6. The Head House tunnel is accessible from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays.  The tunnel is not open on the weekends.  Make sure to remove items from your storage areas during the weekday access times.

You should familiarize yourself with the various agencies/offices in the Emergency Guide in the front of the University phone book.

Protective Services:  780-492-5050

Call 911 for Police, Fire and Ambulance